Volume 2013 Supplement 1

7th Asia Pacific Paediatric Endocrine Society (APPES) Biennial Scientific Meeting

Open Access

Time to peak postprandial glucose levels in childhood-onset diabetic patients analyzed with a continuous glucose monitoring system

  • Junichi Suzuki1,
  • Remi Kuwabara1,
  • Masako Habu1,
  • Misako Okuno1,
  • Ayako Yoshida1 and
  • Tatsuhiko Urakami1
International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology20132013(Suppl 1):P27

https://doi.org/10.1186/1687-9856-2013-S1-P27

Published: 3 October 2013

The risks of complications due to chronic diabetes are indicated by an increase in average blood glucose levels and the range of blood glucose level fluctuation. Postprandial hyperglycemia should be the target of glycemic control in clinical practice. There are few studies on the time to peak postprandial glucose levels in children. Therefore, we investigated the time to peak in childhood-onset diabetic patients using a continuous glucose monitor system (CGMS).

Twenty-seven patients with childhood-onset diabetes were included (male to female ratio, 9:18): 20 had type 1 diabetes, 3 had type 2 diabetes, and 4 had other types of diabetes. All patients underwent CGM on admission using the CGMS; their blood glucose levels were monitored up to 3 h after each meal. The time to peak postprandial blood glucose levels was retrospectively determined.

The CGMS recorded the postprandial glucose levels 266 times. Average peak time of postprandial blood glucose and average blood glucose excursion were 96.3 ± 56.7 min and 86.5 ± 56.7 mg/dL, respectively. The average peak time and average blood glucose excursion were as follows: type 1 diabetes, 91.2 ± 56 min and 80.0 ± 62.3 mg/dL; type 2 diabetes, 92.7 ± 42.6 min and 105.8 ± 52.2 mg/dL; other types of diabetes, 112.1 ± 50.7 min and 82.8 ± 42.7 mg/dL. The average peak time and blood glucose excursion for meals were as follows: breakfast, 108.4 ± 53.7 min and 92.6 ± 60.6 mg/dL; lunch, 93.2 ± 51.8 min and 83.4 ± 48.6 mg/dL; and dinner, 88.3 ± 54.0 min and 83.9 ± 60.0 mg/dL. There was no correlation between time to peak postprandial blood glucose and HbA1c levels.

The average time to peak postprandial blood glucose levels was approximately 90 min in both type 1 and 2 diabetes patients. The time to peak postprandial blood glucose levels reported here was delayed as compared to other studies on Japanese healthy adults with childhood-onset diabetes. The time to peak postprandial blood glucose levels in childhood-onset diabetic patients was approximately 90 min. As an indicator of glycemic control in childhood-onset diabetic patients, the CGMS was considered useful for determining the postprandial blood glucose levels in clinical practice.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Nihon University School of Medicine

Copyright

© Suzuki et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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